1.13.2010

Folk art inspiration and giveaway

I've been seeing folk art inspired design everywhere these days.

 

Tins above are by Finish-English designer Sannu Annukka, whose work is inspired by the folktales of her childhood.




Local letterpresser (and occasional studio mate) Melissa Gruntkosky of Pressbound designed these Polish folk art holiday cards. I love the colors and eagerly await her new designs.



I'm a sucker for any kind of screen printed city scape and would love to add this Sardana folk dance print by Roger and Ginger to my collection.



With Valentine's Day only weeks away, how about these cards by Dutch Door Press.



Couldn't post about folk art without a mention of our own coasters, based on Chinese paper cut art.

What are some of your favorite folk art designs? Post your links in the comments and I'll choose a random comment on Monday to receive a set of our coasters.

7 comments:

gilana said...

I grew up in Pennsylvania, so I've always had a weakness for Pennsylvania Dutch Hex Signs. There's something about the playfulness and the kaleidoscope-like symmetry that I love.

amie said...

just came across these modernized folk art designs, loving them!
http://www.studiohomecreative.com/2008/08/modern-folk-art.html

would love a set of those coasters, they're wonderful :)

Nancy said...

I love German wood carvings. There's tons of them out there, but I especially love those that combine function and humor. My big sis lived in Germany for a few years in the 80s and I visited her when I was about 6. She had (and still has!) this toothpick holder - a little man who kept the toothpicks in his mouth! It's always good for a laugh out of me.

Rebecca said...

I love your coasters! I bought a set for my mother-in-law this Christmas--just gorgeous!

JHill said...

i love them :)

museum of the everyday said...

the cards above with polish style papercuts are great- i love the bright colors & birds in wycinanki

Meg said...

I'm partial to Pennsylvania Dutch wedding pottery (there's a great collection @ the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in their own little room), many pieces manage to be both a captivating example of patternwork and relatively witty or charming reminders of folk sayings and wisdom.